State trying to protect Atlantic sturgeon

May 14th, 2012 | By | Category: Featured Story

By rough estimates, a couple hundred Atlantic sturgeon periodically swim in Long Island Sound and the Connecticut River, remnants of a once-abundant population that supported a commercial fishery that had existed since colonial times.

Deborah Pacileo and Kurt Gottschall of the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection display an Atlantic sturgeon caught during a recent survey in Long Island Sound. (Photo: Tom Savoy, State DEEP)

Deborah Pacileo and Kurt Gottschall of the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection display an Atlantic sturgeon caught during a recent survey in Long Island Sound. (Photo: Tom Savoy, State DEEP)

These large, angular fish, which can be 12 to 14 feet long, weigh 300 to 400 pounds and live 50 to 100 years, last month became one of the newest additions to the federal Endangered Species List, qualifying them for greater protection and restoration efforts. Short-nosed sturgeon, the Atlantic sturgeon’s freshwater cousins that can be found in the upper Connecticut River, have been on the list since 1976.

For more on this story, visit: The Day – State trying to protect Atlantic sturgeon | News from southeastern Connecticut.

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