Officials announce $1.6M+ to Improve Health of Long Island Sound

Sep 25th, 2012 | By | Category: Top Story

Will Help Fund Projects Promoting Education, Planning in Southern Connecticut

NEW HAVEN, CT — U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro (CT-3) announced that three New Haven-based projects to improve the health of the Long Island Sound have been awarded grants to further their goals.  The three are part of a larger group of 35 grants that were announced.

“The Long Island Sound is one of our greatest treasures and holds enormous cultural, historical and economic significance for Connecticut,” DeLauro said. “We have a responsibility to ensure it is protected and preserved so future generations can continue to enjoy it and the exciting projects these grants are funding will help us do just that. I look forward to seeing the results of the Pond Lily Dam Removal Project and how these new programs will share the uniqueness of the Sound with New Haven schoolchildren.”

(photo: cjzurcher)

DeLauro is a co-chair of the Congressional Long Island Sound Caucus, a bipartisan group that coordinates Connecticut and New York efforts to improve the health of the Sound. She is also a leading co-sponsor of the Long Island Sound Restoration and Stewardship Act, which reauthorizes programs that help protect, preserve and restore the Sound’s resources.

The funds for the grants come from the Long Island Sound Futures Fund, a public-private partnership of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and Wells Fargo.

The three New Haven projects receiving funding are listed below.  The first two are for education and the last is for planning purposes.

  • Urban Schoolyard Habitat Partnership, Audubon Connecticut: $34,757.16
  • Long Island Sound Curricula Outreach to CT’s Inner Cities, Sea Research Foundation: $30,603.20
  • Pond Lily Dam Removal Project: Design and Permitting, The Connecticut Fund for the Environment: $60,000

SEE ALSO:

Stormwater runoff contaminated by fertilizers, pet waste, and other chemicals will soon have less of an impact on the health of Conscience Bay thanks to a treatment plan supported by the Long Island Sound Futures Fund.

The Environmental Protection Agency and Long Island Sound Study on Monday announced the Village of Old Field will receive a $200,000 grant for its “Conscience Bay Stormwater Treatment and Wetland Enhancement” project.

For more on this story, visit: Village Nets Grant to Treat Polluted Water – Three Village, NY Patch.

SEE ALSO:

Old Field, NY — Top federal and state environmental officials announced 35 grants totaling $1.6 million awarded to state and local government and community groups in New York and Connecticut under the Long Island Sound Futures Fund. When leveraged by an additional $3 million contributed by the recipients themselves, a total of $4.6 million will support conservation projects in both states. The projects in both states will open up 50 river miles for fish passage, and restore 390 acres of critical fish and wildlife habitat. This habitat includes lakes, underwater grasses, woodlands, meadows, wetlands, beaches and river and park frontage.

This public-private grant program pools funds from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and Wells Fargo.

“These funds will go to hands on projects in communities that represent the diverse interests of Long Island Sound,” said Judith A. Enck, EPA Regional Administrator. “From innovative green practices to restoring habitat to improving water quality, these partnership projects will result in direct benefits as we work to restore the health of Long Island Sound.”

“Protecting and restoring Long Island Sound have long been priorities for EPA,” said EPA Regional Administrator for New England Curt Spalding. “These grants will support vital and diverse projects throughout the region to improve water quality and remove pollution from the Long Island Sound watershed, and involve the public in the protection of one of the nation’s most important natural treasures.”

“One of the greatest environmental challenges facing our communities is the protection and restoration of estuaries,” said David O’Neill, Director, Eastern Partnership Office, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. “The funding awarded today represents the Foundation’s continuing commitment, as well as the commitment of our federal and state partners, to further restoration efforts aimed at improving the overall health of the Long Island Sound.

The Long Island Sound Study initiated the Long Island Sound Futures Fund in 2005 through the EPA’s Long Island Sound Office and NFWF. To date, the program has invested $10.5 million in 261 projects in communities surrounding the Sound. With grantee match of $23 million, the Long Island Sound Futures Fund has generated a total of almost $33.5 million for projects in both states.

“I am pleased to see funding go to projects that engage local communities in the protection and restoration of local fish and wildlife habitats,” said Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “Equally exciting are the partnerships with public and private landowners that will increase our ability to work effectively on opening rivers for native fish and restoring habitat for songbirds and shorebirds, to educating children who are the future stewards of the Sound.”

“As a financial services company with more than 270,000 team members across the country, we know we can influence positive change by reducing the impact of our operations and by strengthening our communities where our team members and customers live and work,” said Joe Kirk, Wells Fargo’s New York and Connecticut regional president. “As a result, we take into account environmental, social and economic considerations during our everyday decision making. Through this approach to sustainability, we are committed to finding new ways to minimize our energy consumption, address climate change, use renewable energy sources, and inspire others to do the same.”

Jay Mar, Connecticut State Conservationist, NRCS, added, “This year’s funding of projects to engage farmers and land managers throughout communities in the watershed will help accomplish important wildlife goals through the New England Cottontail Initiative, and manure management advances to improve ecological and economic health of the Sound.”

“From restoring habitat to reducing pollution to promoting public awareness, these grants will help make tangible improvements in the health of Long Island Sound,” said New York State, Department of Environmental Conservation, Assistant Commissioner for Natural Resources, Kathy Moser. “In addition, the grants ensure the continued involvement of all the community groups and local governments that are so crucial to the state and federal governments’ efforts here. Congratulations and continued success to all of the applicants.”

“Connecticut DEEP is pleased to work with our partners in the Long Island Sound Study to preserve and protect Long Island Sound ? one of the region’s most valuable natural resources,” said Brian Thompson, Director of Long Island Sound Programs. “This year $757,922 in Long Island Sound Futures Funds grants are being awarded to 20 important Connecticut programs. The grant funding covers a wide range of projects including restoration of fish habitat, removal of invasive plants, restoring New England Cottontail Rabbit populations, preparation of significant management plans, and implementation of educational programs that will protect Long Island Sound for future generations.”

Long Island Sound is an estuary that provides economic and recreational benefits to millions of people, while also providing habitat for more than 1,200 invertebrates, 170 species of fish, and dozens of species of migratory birds. The Long Island Sound Study, developed under the EPA’s National Estuary Program, is a cooperative effort between the EPA and the states of Connecticut and New York to protect and restore the Sound and its ecosystem. To learn more about the LISS, visit www.longislandsoundstudy.net. For full descriptions of the Long Island Sound Futures Fund Grants, visit http://longislandsoundstudy.net/about/grants/lis-futures-fund/.

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, established by Congress in 1984, is an international leader in developing public and private funding to protect wildlife and natural resources. In 26 years, NFWF has funded 4,000 organizations and leveraged $576 million in federal funds into $2 billion for conservation. The achievement of clear, measurable results is central to its work. The foundation brings together diverse stakeholders—from industry to Congress to local leaders—to accomplish positive outcomes. NFWF currently works with 14 federal partners and more than 50 corporate and foundation partners. To learn more about NFWF, visit www.nfwf.org.

FIFTEEN LONG ISLAND SOUND FUTURES FUND GRANTS — NEW YORK

HABITAT RESTORATION AND SPECIES CONSERVATION GRANTS

Rodman’s Neck Coastal Forest Restoration, Phase II, Bronx, NY
City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS Funds): $100,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $216,000

Alley Pond Park Restoration and Stewardship, Douglaston, NY
City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS Funds): $100,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $200,000

The “Marine Meadows” Eelgrass Restoration Program, NY and CT
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County
LISFF Grant (EPA): $95,341
Grantee Matching Funds: $97,651

Great Gull Island Management and Invasives Control Project, Town of Southold, NY
University of Connecticut
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $39,865.65
Grantee Matching Funds: $33,023

CLEAN WATER GRANTS

Conscience Bay Stormwater Treatment & Wetland Enhancement, Old Field, NY
Village of Old Field
LISFF Grant (EPA Funds): $200,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $274,762

Engaging Vineyards to Implement a Stewardship Program, Town of Southold, NY
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County
LISFF Grant (EPA Funds): $128,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $200,224

Plan for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment, North Fork, NY
Peconic Green Growth
LISFF Grant (EPA): $60,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $85,150

EDUCATION GRANTS

Student Watershed Initiative – Smithtown Bay thru Mt Sinai, NY Friends of Flax Pond
LISFF Grant (EPA): $35,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $70,002

Randall’s Island Wetlands Stewardship Program, New York, NY
Randall’s Island Park Alliance
LISFF Grant (EPA and Wells Fargo): $35,000 Grantee Matching Funds: $115,000

Onsite Septic Training and Certification Program, North Shore, Nassau County, NY
Town of Oyster Bay
LISFF Grant (EPA): $30,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $41,988

Kayak Access and Ecosystem Educational Signage, Rye NY
Committee to Save the Bird Homestead
LISFF Grant (EPA): $10,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $11,980

Festival of Little Neck Bay and Long Island Sound, Douglaston, NY
Alley Pond Environmental Center
LISFF Grant (EPA): $8,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $8,000

Long Island Sound Component – 2012 NY Beach Cleanup, NY
American Littoral Society
LISFF Grant (EPA): $6,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $150,000

WATER QUALITY MONITORING GRANTS

Hempstead Harbor 2012 Water Quality Monitoring Program, Hempstead Harbor, NY
Village of Sea Cliff
LISFF Grant (EPA): $40,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $57,677

Friends of the Bay Water Quality Monitoring 2012, Oyster Bay, Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Friends of the Bay
LISFF Grant (EPA): $25,996
Grantee Matching Funds: $79,965

TWENTY LONG ISLAND SOUND FUTURES FUND GRANTS 2012 — CONNECTICUT

 

HABITAT RESTORATION AND SPECIES CONSERVATION GRANTS

Fish Passage on the Farmington River, Farmington and Pequabuck Rivers, CT
Farmington River Watershed Association
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $65,800
Grantee Matching Funds: $560,000

 

Roger’s Lake Fish Passage: Last Barrier to Alewive Run, Old Lyme, CT
Connecticut River Watershed Council
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $85,777.50
Grantee Matching Funds: $85,528

Calf Island Forest Restoration and Invasives Control, Greenwich, CT
Calf Island Conservancy
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $22,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $27,771

Restoring Coastal Forest and Habitat for New England Cottontail, Stonington, CT
Avalonia Land Conservancy
LISFF Grant (FWS and NRCS): $25,670
Grantee Matching Funds: $30,950

CLEAN WATER GRANTS

Nutrient Bioextraction by Seaweed in Long Island Sound, NY and CT
University of Connecticut
LISFF Grant (EPA): $157,447.67
Grantee Matching Funds: $286,143

Manure Digestion on Dairy Farm to Reduce Nitrogen and Phosperus Pollution, East Canaan, CT Connecticut Farm Bureau Association
LISFF Grant (EPA and NRCS): $91,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $45,000

EDUCATION GRANTS

Urban Schoolyard Habitat Partnership, New Haven and Stamford, CT
Audubon Connecticut
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $34,757.16
Grantee Matching Funds: $104,837

Establishing a NOFA Organic Lawn Care Certificate Program, CT
Northeast Organic Farming Association of Connecticut
LISFF Grant (EPA): $32,000.81
Grantee Matching Funds: $32,633

Long Island Sound Curricula Outreach to CT’s Inner Cities, Norwich, New London, and New Haven, CT
Sea Research Foundation
LISFF Grant (EPA): $30,603.20
Grantee Matching Funds: $31,743

Project Limulus: A Community Outreach and Education Program, NY and CT
Sacred Heart University
LISFF Grant (EPA): $24,730
Grantee Matching Funds: $63,148

Sheffield Island Park Interpretive Signage Project, Norwalk, CT
Norwalk Seaport Association
LISFF Grant (EPA): $9,525
Grantee Matching Funds: $5,365

Norwich Harbor Canoe and Kayak Trail, Norwich, CT
City of Norwich Harbor Management Commission
LISFF Grant (EPA): $8,130
Grantee Matching Funds: $4,530

Connecticut River Museum Environmental Education Programs, Essex, CT
Connecticut River Museum
LISFF Grant (EPA): $7,226
Grantee Matching Funds: $15,570

Estuary Health Program, Mystic Aquarium, CT
Sea Research Foundation
LISFF Grant (EPA): $7,110.50
Grantee Matching Funds: $6,678

Connecticut River Coastal Estuary Cleanup and Education, CT
Connecticut River Watershed Council
LISFF Grant (EPA): $4,485
Grantee Matching Funds: $5,220

Mianus River Streambank Restoration: Native Species, Stamford, CT
Friends of Mianus River Park
LISFF Grant (EPA): $3,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $3,000

PLANNING GRANTS

Pond Lily Dam Removal Project: Design and Permitting, New Haven, CT
The Connecticut Fund for the Environment
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $60,000
Grantee Matching Funds: $57,037

Barn Island Wildlife Management Area Plan, Stonington, CT
State of Connecticut
LISFF Grant (EPA): $23,999
Grantee Matching Funds: $15,851

Norton Paper Mill Dam Fish Passage Assessment, Colchester, CT
The Nature Conservancy
LISFF Grant (EPA and FWS): $40,000.45
Grantee Matching Funds: $21,044

WATER QUALITY MONITORING GRANTS

Water Quality Project To Manage Pollution Problems, Stonington, CT
Clean Up Stonington Harbors
LISFF Grant (EPA): $24,659
Grantee Matching Funds: $22,675

Related Files

2012 Awards Map (Adobe PDF File)
More Than $1.6 Million Awarded for Community-Based Projects to Improve Health and Vitality of Long Island Sound (Adobe PDF File)

For more on this story, visit: National Fish and Wildlife Foundation | More Than $1.6 Million Awarded for Community-Based Projects to Improve Health and Vitality of Long Island Sound.

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