Pollution is segregated, including in New Haven | Washington Post

Apr 24th, 2014 | By | Category: Featured Story
English Station was an oil burning power station located across the Quinnipiac River from Fair Haven, one of the poorest areas in New Haven.   Researchers at the University of Minnesota, that minorities are exposed to more of the pollution than whites.

English Station was an oil burning power station located across the Quinnipiac River from Fair Haven, one of the poorest areas in New Haven. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found that minorities are exposed to more of the pollution than whites.

Studies dating back to the 1970s have pointed to a consistent pattern in who lives near the kinds of hazards —  toxic waste siteslandfillscongested highways — that few of us would willingly choose as neighbors. The invariable answer: poor people and communities of color.

This pattern of “environmental injustice” suggests that minorities may contend every day with disproportionate health risks from tailpipe exhaust or coal plant emissions. But these health risks are harder to quantify than, say, the number of power plants in a city. And most of the research that has tried to do this has been limited to a single metropolitan area, or to those few places that happen to have good monitoring data on pollution.

… In one graphic, the New York/Newark metropolitan area ranks as having the widest disparity in average exposure between lower-income minority census block groups and upper-income white ones across the entire metro area. New York is followed by Philadelphia; Bridgeport/Stamford, Conn.; Boston; Providence, R.I.; Detroit; Los Angeles; and New Haven, Conn.

For more on this story, visit: Pollution is segregated, too.

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