What Gets Flushed Into Rivers as More Rain Hits the Northeast?

Apr 30th, 2014 | By | Category: Water
Muddy sediment empties into Long Island Sound from the Connecticut River after Hurricane Irene in 2011. (NASA Earth Observatory)

Muddy sediment empties into Long Island Sound from the Connecticut River after Hurricane Irene in 2011. (NASA Earth Observatory)

Connecticut and the Northeast region have gotten a lot more rain over the years. A report from the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration found a 67 percent increase since 1958, more than any other part of the country.

Now researchers at Yale University want to find out what happens to the chemical composition and water quality of the Connecticut River watershed and the Long Island Sound with more heavy rain.

The five-year study focuses on something called dissolved organic matter, explained Peter Raymond, a professor of ecosystem ecology at Yale and lead investigator of the study. He said it’s a lot like tea.

For more on this story, visit: What Gets Flushed Into Rivers as More Rain Hits the Northeast? | WNPR News.

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