A Hartford Eyesore Turned Solar Oasis

Sep 5th, 2014 | By | Category: Energy, Top Story
The solar array is on top of 10 million tons of capped-off waste in Hartford's north end. (photo: Materials Innovation and Recycling Authority)

The solar array is on top of 10 million tons of capped-off waste in Hartford’s north end. (photo: Materials Innovation and Recycling Authority)

There is a new solar array in Hartford. It is the first solar-energy project to be built atop a closed landfill in the state. If you’ve driven north through Hartford, you’ve seen it alongside Interstate 91. It’s what we used to call “that huge dump” in Hartford. Now it is freckled with vents, which, I predict, will one day also be tapped for the energy they can provide.

At peak capacity, the new solar array is expected to generate 1 megawatt of power per day, or enough to power about 1,000 homes per day, NPR reports in the story linked to below.

The array is on top of an old landfill in Hartford’s north end, which received raw waste until the late 1980s. If you’re driving on Interstate 91 today, you can still see the old landfill, but it doesn’t look like a mountain of trash. The roughly ten million tons of waste is capped with a synthetic membrane that keeps out rainwater and looks like grass.

For more on this story, visit: A Hartford Eyesore Turned Solar Oasis | WNPR News.

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