Posts Tagged ‘ farming ’

Naturally Grown: An alternative label to organic

Aug 18th, 2013 | By

Started by a group of organic farmers in New York’s mid-Hudson Valley as a backlash against federal takeover of the organic program in 2002, Certified Naturally Grown has expanded over the past decade to include more than 700 farms in 47 states including Connecticut, executive director Alice Varon said. For more on this story, visit:

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Foothills Media Group Editorial: Farmers aren’t nuisances

Feb 27th, 2013 | By

This week, Torrington became the latest municipality in Connecticut to approve a right-to-farm ordinance that shields legitimate farmers—those operating on at least three acres of land—from lawsuits.



Reasons to Buy Organic: Let Us Count the Ways. Scientist refutes Stanford analysis | The Equation

Sep 14th, 2012 | By

As a scientist, scientist Margaret Mellon was pleased to see a major meta-analysis (a study of studies) on the nutritional and safety aspects of organic food, but she found the interpretation by the authors of the study and news media disconcerting—and surprising. The Stanford analysis confirmed that in comparison with conventional food, organic food has

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The Renaissance of the Connecticut Farm

Sep 10th, 2012 | By

After years of decline, Connecticut farms are on the rise, and they’re smaller, more diverse, and more self-sufficient than ever before. It seemed for a long while that Connecticut farms were going out with the 20th century as more and more farms were being plowed under to make way for new suburban housing and commercial

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Heat, lack of rain affecting local farming

Jul 16th, 2012 | By

This summer’s heat thus far has local farmers struggling to keep their crop’s quality up to par, which could cause food prices to increase. They say the heat combined with the lack of rain is an awful combination for their business. via  Heat, lack of rain affecting local farming | The New Britain Herald.



‘Jewish Local Greens’ CSA Offers Organic Vegetables in W. Hartford

Apr 24th, 2012 | By

Jewish Local Greens is a CSA (Community-Supported Agriculture). Members pay up front for a season’s worth of produce, grown at our partner farm (Adamah, in Falls Village CT, a certified organic, Jewish educational farm). The CSA system shortens the distance from farm to table, benefiting the health of our bodies, our wallets and the earth.

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Genetically modified crops may be contaminating local crop fields

Feb 17th, 2012 | By

Let’s say you’re an organic farmer here in Connecticut, and your cornfield gets fertilized by windblown or bee-transported pollen from your neighbor’s crop. You could become the next target of an angry agri-business giant and lose your organic status. Monsanto is the king of genetically modified seeds. In fact, it’s the world’s biggest seed producer,

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Sullivan family proud to preserve farm

Jan 22nd, 2012 | By

A dean of New Milford’s farmers and his wife, Beth, 88, to whom he has been married 65 years, still live in the home they built in 1953 alongside the original farm homestead that dates back to the 1840s.Nanci G. Hutson of the Danbury News-Times reports.



New and transitioning organic farming conference Jan. 28, Middletown, CT

Dec 20th, 2011 | By

Register today for our Getting Started in Organic Farming Conference to be held Saturday, January 28, 2012 at the CT Forests and Parks Association in Middletown, CT. The Getting Started in Organic Farming Conference draws both beginning farmers who choose to farm organically and established farmers who are converting their operations to organic.



Study Confirms Agriculture’s Importance to Connecticut Economy

Sep 30th, 2010 | By

A study of agriculture in Connecticut found that the industry provides $3.5 billion a year in sales — an output that translates to $1,000 per Connecticut resident. The industry also generates 20,000 jobs statewide, two-thirds of which are from farming alone.

Additionally, the industry contributes about $1.7 billion in ‘value added,’ which is the difference between the value of output and the cost of raw materials — the money left in the hands of residents and business taxes, both of which stay in Connecticut.