Posts Tagged ‘ NOAA ’

NOAA grant to help clear storm debris from Connecticut’s shoreline

Jul 23rd, 2014 | By

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program has awarded $752,822 in federal funds to the state to help remove marine debris from Connecticut’s shoreline, including a tidal marsh area in Old Saybrook, according to the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. The Marine Debris Program funds were made available to states impacted

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What Gets Flushed Into Rivers as More Rain Hits the Northeast?

Apr 30th, 2014 | By
Muddy sediment empties into Long Island Sound from the Connecticut River after Hurricane Irene in 2011. (NASA Earth Observatory)

researchers at Yale University want to find out what happens to the chemical composition and water quality of the Connecticut River watershed and the Long Island Sound with more heavy rain.



Hartford Riverfest postponed because of high Connecticut River water levels

Jul 4th, 2013 | By

The signature event in the capital city has been postponed because of a new report from The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and National Weather Service on flooding.



NOAA Seafloor Mapping Project Delivers Diverse Data

Oct 12th, 2012 | By

In addition to updating NOAA’s nautical charts, ongoing collaborations in Long Island Sound will create products that depict physical, geological, ecological, geomorphological, and biological conditions and processes – all to balance the development of new ocean uses while protecting and restoring essential habitats.



NOAA: 2011 a year of climate extremes in the United States

Jan 20th, 2012 | By

According to NOAA scientists, 2011 was a record-breaking year for climate extremes, as much of the United States faced historic levels of heat, precipitation, flooding and severe weather, while La Niña events at both ends of the year impacted weather patterns at home and around the world.

NOAA’s annual analysis of U.S. and global conditions, conducted by scientists at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, reports that the average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 53.8 degrees F, 1.0 degree F above the 20th century average, making it the 23rd warmest year on record.